Depakote birth defects (part 1)

April 07, 2011 @ 01:02 PM -- by

 As a Texas Depakote birth defects lawyer, I have been following the various birth defects associated with this drug. Depakote is an antiseizure medicine made by Abbott Laboratories. The drug is prescribed in the United States for various neurological disorders, including manic behavior, bipolar disorder, seizures and migraine headaches. Depakote is also prescribed to treat bipolar depression, Bipolar 1 disorder, bipolar disorder in remission, rapid cycle manic-depression, chronic pain, epilepsy and neuropathy.

In 2006, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a black box warning for Depakote to inform patients after various studies showed a wide range of serious side effects associated with the medication. These dangerous side effects include birth defects like spina bifida, as well as hepatic failure and pancreatitis.

Birth defects which have been linked to Depakote also include:

Intrauterine growth retardation

Trial Septal Defect

Cleft Palate

Rypospadias (opening of the urethra in boys is in the wrong spot)

Craniosynostosis (bones in the skull close too early)

Polydactyly (child has over 5 fingers on each hand)

Undescended Testes

Hypoplastic right heart (underdeveloped right side of the heart)

Fetal valproate syndrome

Hand Malformations

Dysplastic (abnormally developed) Ribs

Growth retardation

Death of the fetus

Babies who were born to women taking the drug were five (5) times more likely in one study, and fourteen (14) times more likely in a different study, to have extremely serious birth defects as well as other congenital problems. The birth defects in these studies included spina bifida, as well as other neural tube defects. Medical researchers have asserted that women should not take Depakote, if at all possible, during their childbearing years.

Dr. Page Pennell with the Emory University School of Medicine did a recent study which was presented at the American Academy of Neurology. This study showed that serious birth defect problems were much more common when Depakote was taken during pregnancy, when compared to patients who took various other anti-epileptic drugs.

Contact Texas Depakote birth defects attorney Scott Nelson if you need assistance with your Depakote case.

 

 

As a Texas Depakote birth defects lawyer, I have been following the various birth defects associated with this drug. Depakote is an antiseizure medicine made by Abbott Laboratories. The drug is prescribed in the United States for various neurological disorders, including manic behavior, bipolar disorder, seizures and migraine headaches. Depakote is also prescribed to treat bipolar depression, Bipolar 1 disorder, bipolar disorder in remission, rapid cycle manic-depression, chronic pain, epilepsy and neuropathy.

In 2006, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a black box warning for Depakote to inform patients after various studies showed a wide range of serious side effects associated with the medication. These dangerous side effects include birth defects like spina bifida, as well as hepatic failure and pancreatitis.

Birth defects which have been linked to Depakote also include:

Intrauterine growth retardation

Trial Septal Defect

Cleft Palate

Rypospadias (opening of the urethra in boys is in the wrong spot)

Craniosynostosis (bones in the skull close too early)

Polydactyly (child has over 5 fingers on each hand)

Undescended Testes

Hypoplastic right heart (underdeveloped right side of the heart)

Fetal valproate syndrome

Hand Malformations

Dysplastic (abnormally developed) Ribs

Growth retardation

Death of the fetus

/Depakote-Birth-Defect-Lawsuits/Spina-Bifida.shtml/Depakote-Birth-Defect-Lawsuits/Intrauterine-Growth-Retardation.shtml/Depakote-Birth-Defect-Lawsuits/Cleft-Palate.shtml/Depakote-Birth-Defect-Lawsuits/Hypoplastic-Right-Heart.shtmlBabies who were born to women taking the drug were five (5) times more likely in one study, and fourteen (14) times more likely in a different study, to have extremely serious birth defects as well as other congenital problems. The birth defects in these studies included spina bifida, as well as other neural tube defects. Medical researchers have asserted that women should not take Depakote, if at all possible, during their childbearing years.

Dr. Page Pennell with the Emory University School of Medicine did a recent study which was presented at the American Academy of Neurology. This study showed that serious birth defect problems were much more common when Depakote was taken during pregnancy, when compared to patients who took various other anti-epileptic drugs.

 

Contact Texas Depakote birth defects attorney Scott Nelson if you need assistance with your Depakote case.

Since I am a Texas Depakote birth defects lawyer, I follow the various studies dealing with this drug. Another recent study has also shown a much higher rate of problems in babies whose mothers took Depakote while pregnant. This study will be presented in Vancouver, Canada in the Summer of 2011 at a meeting of birth defect specialists. In this study, scientists followed 149 women with epilepsy who took the drug from early in their pregnancies to the time after delivery. This study will show that among mothers who took the drug, 11% had children which had birth defects. The most common birth defect was spina bifida. Spina bifida is a neural tube defect where the child’s spinal cord development is incomplete or deformed. Interestingly, the same type of spina bifida (and other neural tube defects) were only seen in 3% of children of mothers who were taking all other anti-seizure drugs studied combined. Moreover, this study has also shown that less than 2% of children born to mothers who do not have epilepsy had similar congenital birth defects. As such, this study shows something amazing-- a 500% higher risk for serious birth defects or other complications when a pregnant women took Depakote while pregnant.

Specifically, other data indicates that:

Children whose mothers took Depakote during the first trimester of their pregnancy were over 12 times more likely to have spina bifida than mothers who did not take the drug (This data is for valproic acid, which is the active and key ingredient in Depakote.);

Mothers who took Depakote while pregnant were five times more likely to have a child with a cleft palate or a penis abnormality;

Mothers who took Depakote while pregnant were 2.5 times more likely to have a heart defect;

Mothers who took Depakote while pregnant were over two times as likely to have an extra digit on their hand;

Mothers who took Depakote early in their pregnancy had 2 to 12 times the risk of having a child who had one of six specific birth defects in comparison to mothers who did not take any epilepsy drugs; and

Mothers who took Depakote are 7 times more likely to have a child who has premature fusion of the skull during fetal development (this limits the child’s brain growth).